Exercise: Complimentary Colours

01/05/15

Complimentary Colours

Complimentary colours are at opposite sides of the colour spectrum. One way to learn about locating and mixing these colours is to make your own colour wheel.

Colour wheel exploring complimentary colours Attempt 1 Acrylic

Colour wheel exploring complimentary colours
Attempt 1
Acrylic

06/05/15

Colour wheel exploring complimentary colours Attempt 2 Acrylic

Colour wheel exploring complimentary colours
Attempt 2
Acrylic

Next, consider the twelve colours from Chevreul’s colour circle and lay each colour next to its opposite or complimentary on a grey ground.  Try to match the darker tone to the lighter by adding white.

and

Make mixtures of each pair of complimentary colours. Make a note of the colours mixed and describe the resulting colour. this is another way of creating broken or tertiary colours.

and

Look closely at the effect that complimentary colours have on each other and try to explain this in your notes.

Comparing and mixing complimentary colours on a neutral grey ground. Acrylic.

Comparing and mixing complimentary colours on a neutral grey ground.
Acrylic.

NB Observations are noted next to examples.

 

Exercise: Broken or Tertiary Colours

22/04/15

Broken or Tertiary Colours

Make a scale between an orange red and a green blue. Try to maintain consistent tonal values across the scale by adding a little white, as in previous exercise.

Broken or Tertiary Colours Orange Red to Green Blue Acrylic paint on neutral grey ground.

Broken or Tertiary Colours
Orange Red to Green Blue
Acrylic paint on neutral grey ground.

I began this exercise with enthusiasm but also a low supply of ultramarine blue. As I progressed along the scale, which appeared to be going well (still in the reds) I ran out of ultramarine completely.  Never fear I thought, I have a student quality Cobalt Blue, which, as previously covered was not Cobalt Blue PB28 but a mix of Ultramarine PB29 and Titanium White PW6, as I had to add a little white to maintain tone it seemed logical that this would be a good substitute for the Ultramarine.  As I carried on, I was perturbed to find that instead of grey, my mixes were appearing more green.  As I stared at the mixes both on the palette and on the grey ground I glanced at the tube of blue paint I had been using – Coeruleum Blue, (PB15,3/PW5/PY184) with a yellow pigment as Bismuth Vanadate Yellow that explains why I was getting more green than blue. An irritating mistake but I am pleased I know where I went wrong and can redo the process when I have new supplies.

More to come…

29/04/15

A little break away and then returned to this exercise using the correct blue this time.

Broken or Tertiary Colours Orange Red to Green Blue and Orange to Violet Acrylic paint on neutral grey ground  2nd attempt

Broken or Tertiary Colours
Orange Red to Green Blue
and
Orange to Violet
Acrylic paint on neutral grey ground
2nd attempt

This entire exercise was a revelation demonstrating the range of colours that may be mixed from the primaries to make secondary, and subsequently, creating tertiary colours.