Supplementary Material – Part 4 Drawing Figures

25/10/14

Life Class

Life Class 25/10/14 4B Pencil on Grey Paper Quick Poses 5 -10 mins

Life Class 25/10/14
4B Pencil on Grey Paper
Quick Poses 5 -10 mins

Life Class 25/10/14 6B Pencil on Grey Paper Quick Poses 15 mins

Life Class 25/10/14
6B Pencil on Grey Paper
Quick Poses 15 mins

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today’s theme was using a piece of stretchy fabric that was draped or pulled taut over the figure.  We were to concentrate on the folds, be they loose and fluid or stretched tight over the body.

Life Class 25/10/14 Sanguine, dark brown and white conte stick on brown wrapping paper (matt side)  25 mins pose

Life Class 25/10/14
Sanguine, dark brown and white conte stick on brown wrapping paper (matt side)
25 mins pose

Life Class 25/10/14 Sanguine, dark brown. black and white conte stick on brown wrapping paper (matt side)  40 mins pose

Life Class 25/10/14
Sanguine, dark brown. black and white conte stick on brown wrapping paper (matt side)
40 mins pose

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the longer poses, we were encouraged to change media and draw the figure, the first pose used the fabric, the second didn’t.

 

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Supplementary Material – Part 4 Drawing Figures

27/09/14

Life Drawing Class

Today’s life class introduced a new model to most of us.  Annie is a very tall, statuesque figure with grace and poise with fantastic curves and lines – a pleasure to draw.

We started with the usual fairly quick poses of 5-7 minutes, perched on a chair back, standing leaning on

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14 5-7 minute poses Pencil on A2 paper

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14
5-7 minute poses
Pencil on A2 paper

the chair and sitting on the chair.  As is usual the first drawing is tight and static, but the standing drawing shows the lean and slight twist in the body with the weight firmly on the right foot.  The seated pose was a little off proportionately but the weight of the figure is on the chair.

 

 

The next two poses were seated on a chair and on the floor.  Standing at the side of the room I had a lot of foreshortening to contend with – I enjoy this challenge and it usually makes for a more interesting image.

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14 10-12 minute poses Pencil on A2 paper

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14
10-12 minute poses
Pencil on A2 paper

The pose seated on a chair, with the model turned towards me showed fabulous long, curvy lines on the model’s right side which were very tactile to draw. I tried to vary the line strengths and use tone to help denote the foreshortening.  However, today, hands are getting the better of me, I don’t think I managed to achieve success in a single drawing!

The next, seated on the floor was again a beautiful pose.  Annie held her hand up in a most elegant way and I totally made it into a bunch of bananas.  In my defence, I was concentrating on the back against the cushions, where the flesh was pressed and folded around the supporting structure.  Again, tried to use a variety of line strengths.

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14 10-12 minute poses Pencil on A2 paper

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14
10-12 minute poses
Coloured pencil on A2 paper

The final long pose was around 40 minutes, I decided to move round to the other side of the model as I could only see one hand (and I obviously need the practice), plus the foreshortened, bent leg was more interesting to draw.  Although I started out plotting the shapes in the space, as I drew I noticed that I needed to make the upper chest area longer, which resulted in slicing off the top of the head unfortunately.  I had also decided to use coloured pencil which I hadn’t tried before in life drawing.  This was probably the largest I would have wanted to draw in this media and although it was nice to be able to vary the line strength as with graphite pencil, I did find it limiting with regards to depth of tone.

As usual, with our classes, there was a specific objective or consideration as a theme.  Today, we looked at cropping to make an image more readable, selective and/or attractive for want of a better word.  We had a selection of pre-cut mounts to put over our drawings to experiment with the final composition.  Although, we try to consider the placement of our subjects prior to beginning our drawings, there are inevitably instances where, another image can be discovered by selecting specific areas on which to concentrate, or, as demonstrated above, if you manage to get the placement wrong, you may be able to rescue this with careful cropping.

Below are some attempts to “crop” my drawings of today:

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14 Placing a virtural mount to "crop" the image

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14
Placing a virtual mount to “crop” the image

 

Here, I chose to crop in this way as the model appears to be looking off into the distance, so this gives her the space to do that.

 

 

 

 

 

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14 Placing a virtural mount to "crop" the image

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14
Placing a virtual mount to “crop” the image

 

This produced a nice diagonal design which leaves space for the image to “breathe” and allows the eye to follow around the space.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14 Placing a virtural mount to "crop" the image

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14
Placing a virtual mount to “crop” the image

 

Well, yes, the ulterior motive is to cut out the awful depiction of the model’s hand, however, it also gives a pleasing diagonal design to the image and concentrates the eye on the flowing lines of the figure.

 

 

 

 

 

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14 Placing a virtural mount to "crop" the image

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14
Placing a virtual mount to “crop” the image

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14 Placing a virtural mount to "crop" the image

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14
Placing a virtual mount to “crop” the image

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two images from one.  The first is again, an attempt to rescue the unsuccessful subject placement, it also helps give the model a support for her leaning pose.  The edge of the crop almost appears to be the object she is leaning against.  In the second example, an area is selected on which the viewer can concentrate and transforms the image from a landscape orientation to portrait.

This, again, was a valuable and timely exercise.  It is something I will take into consideration for the preparation of my forthcoming assignment of two figure drawings.  Of course, the concentration will be on form, structure, line and tone as appropriate but the placement of the figure in the space is also an important factor.  I will look back at my still life drawings in my sketchbook as those arrangements on the page contributed to making the entire image more interesting.

Supplementary Material – Part 4 Drawing Figures

25/09/14

Portrait Class

Today’s class objective was an interesting and valuable exercise.  We were to draw the same model from three different view points, on the same piece of paper and to the same scale.  We were to imagine we were providing visual instructions to a sculptor so that they could render a three-dimensional image of the sitter.  Initially, our tutor talked to us about the skull, using one he happened to have, indicating the bone structure.  We observed the cranium, brows and eye sockets, where the lower jaw joined the skull, the bony bridge of the nose etc. We were instructed to create the structure of the head first taking these points into consideration.

Depending on where we stood in relation to the model, we each had variations of a “front on” and two opposing profile views.  We were to work in pencil, draw the first pose for several minutes, then the next two in turn and repeating until the end of the session.  We should have each had one piece with three head and neck studies from three differing view points as a result.

Portrait Class 25/09/14 Three head study - three different view points 6B & 8B pencil on paper

Portrait Class 25/09/14
Three head study – three different view points
6B & 8B pencil on paper

I had a fairly straight on view so when Chris, our model, swiveled his chair I had almost a full profile to work with.

The front on study was probably the most successful overall, although the likeness was a little stronger in the second, with the struggle being obvious in the third.

I tried to keep the scale similar although I had a tendency to increase this, particularly in the last study.  Chris has very distinctive features and his mouth would relax into quite a pout which was crucial to a likeness but very difficult to achieve, I also seemed to have made his eyes a little staring which gives my drawings a disconcerting look!

Portrait Class 25/09/14 Three head study - Detail - front-on view 6B & 8B pencil on paper

Portrait Class 25/09/14
Three head study – Detail – front-on view
6B & 8B pencil on paper

Portrait Class 25/09/14 Three head study - Detail - left side view 6B & 8B pencil on paper

Portrait Class 25/09/14
Three head study – Detail – left side view
6B & 8B pencil on paper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Portrait Class 25/09/14 Three head study - Detail - Right side view 6B & 8B pencil on paper

Portrait Class 25/09/14
Three head study – Detail – Right side view
6B & 8B pencil on paper

Portrait Class - Early 2014 Previous painted portrait of Chris in oil on board

Portrait Class – Early 2014
Previous painted portrait of Chris in oil on board

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have also added a portrait painted over two 2 1/2 hour sessions earlier this year as a comparison.  It shows how the skull structure studies are very useful to judge placement of “landmarks”, the ears are particularly noticeable as being too large in the painting.  The general structure of the face is more accurate although some of the features, mostly in the third study, are a quite wrong.  A general observation I would make, it that the clinical approach in the studies makes for a less lively image.  However, as a preparatory method for accuracy, with more practice, it’s a great foundation for a painting – although, I think our imaginary sculptor would really struggle with my visual instructions!

Supplementary Material – Part 4 Drawing Figures

18/09/14

Portrait Class

First lesson in the new term of our Portrait Class.  As usual at the beginning of a term, we produced drawings rather than paintings, the theme for the morning was “body language”.  This fitted in really well with the “The Moving Figure” project I was in the middle of doing.  Trying to convey a person’s mood by capturing the stance, attitude and body language of the pose.  David our model was instructed to playact a variety of moods and emotions by his body language and pose.

Portrait Class 18/09/14 Studies in Watersoluble Pen on A2 paper

Portrait Class 18/09/14
Studies in Watersoluble Pen on A2 paper

These were 5-7 minutes long so we had to work quickly at getting down the salient points of his mood.  The standing pose was the least successful for me, although he looks like he’s waiting around, I made him far too upright. Again, as many times before, this may have been as it was the first drawing and I hadn’t loosened up. The second pose was supposed to be “arrogance”, this I could have pushed further.  The last pose being “dejection” was nearer the mark, his shoulders are slumped and his hands hanging loose as was his head hanging in despair.

 

 

Portrait Class 18/09/14 Study in Pencil on A2 paper

Portrait Class 18/09/14
Study in Pencil on A2 paper

 

A relaxed “on holiday” feel to this pose, I was obviously starting to warm up finally, as this one is more successful.  I can imagine an entire composition around this pose. (23 minutes).

 

 

 

 

 

Portrait Class 18/09/14 Studies in Pencil on A2 paper

Portrait Class 18/09/14
Studies in Pencil on A2 paper

Two studies of the upper half of the body only, so in larger scale. I can’t actually remember the instruction to the model on the first one, but he does look pensive in my drawing, so we’ll go with that.  Ran out of time to elaborate on the full pose but managed to concentrate on the face.  The second pose proved more of a challenge by incorporating the hands cupping the face.  It seemed to be more important to get the positioning correct and this took most of the time allowed. Although you do get a sense of someone being fed up even with the lack of detail. (10-15 minutes each).

 

Portrait Class 18/09/14 Study in Charcoal and Pencil on A2 paper

Portrait Class 18/09/14
Study in Charcoal and Pencil on A2 paper

 

The final pose scenario is noted on the drawing.  As I attempted to switch media again, I sabotaged myself as I couldn’t get a satisfactory result with the charcoal and time was running out.  Therefore, I switched back to pencil as it was working better for me at the time.  A bit of a panicky result but in retrospect, maybe the basic information was there if not the detail.

 

 

 

Overall, this was a very helpful session with regard to this section of the course and allowed a little more time to work into the drawings which was nice after the previous day’s exercise of “Sitting and Waiting” and quick sketches.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Supplementary Material – Part 4 Drawing Figures

13/09/14

Life Drawing Class

New term today for life drawing classes – very bad timing on my part to start Part 4 Drawing Figures, just as the summer holidays began, hopefully, though I can get a few classes in before the end of this section.

A gentle start with Sally our model, being very patient with the 2 minute poses, which actually went on for 5-7 minutes!

13/09/14 Life Class 5-7 min poses Black conte stick

13/09/14 Life Class
5-7 min poses
Black conte stick

 

 

 

Establishing weight and stance in the pose. The standing ones fairly successful but the seated pose is rather shortened in the torso – never mind, we’ve only just started!

 

 

 

13/09/14 Life Class 10 min pose Black conte stick

13/09/14 Life Class
10 min pose
Black conte stick

 

 

Again, trying to establish the weight of the figure together with the gesture of the pose. Sally was lounging on a chair propped on cushions with her head resting against the wall – unfortunately, was not able to convey this very well, she appears a little  uncomfortable?

 

 

 

13/09/14 Life Class 15 min pose 4B pencil

13/09/14 Life Class
15 min pose
4B pencil

 

 

Tutor decided to ask Sally to wear her black boots for added interest. Model was propped up on cushions again but this time with her shoulders and elbows taking the strain. Tried to note the joints in the knees, the weight in the elbows and the hunch of the shoulders.  The muscles in the thigh were visible pushing the flesh beneath into the floor.

 

 

13/09/14 Life Class 20 min pose Charcoal and putty rubber

13/09/14 Life Class
20 min pose
Charcoal and putty rubber

 

 

A tricky and compact seated pose this time. Instead of attempting an initial line drawing, I decided to cover the space with a layer of charcoal and then sculpt out the lighter shapes.  This method helped me visualise the pose on the paper without confusing lines.  Working in this way, I could strengthen the darks and lighten the lights easily and the image was drawn out of the charcoal background. The putty rubber became a little ineffective to bring out the real highlights, so a plastic, harder eraser was also used and this removed more of the charcoal.  I was pleased with this as I have also managed to convey the weight of the chin on Sally’s hand, and created a more complete image in a fairly short time.

 

 

13/09/14 Life Class 30 min pose Liner pen and conte sticks in black, sanguine and white.

13/09/14 Life Class
30 min pose
Liner pen and conte sticks in black, sanguine and white.

This was supposed to be a longer pose of about 45 minutes, unfortunately, it was difficult to set up as the model had had some back problems. We therefore had a 30 minute pose in the end. I think this encouraged me to work quickly and expressively with the pen to get the basic form down on the paper. Accuracy and form were eventually gained by going round and up and down the figure repeatedly.  I then strengthened the tones, lines and shapes with conte stick.  This was interesting as the liner pen initially seemed very dominant, but once a heavier, more solid medium was added, it actually gave the finished result a more delicate line, which was almost lost in the end.  The model’s left arm leaves a little to be desired, but in general this was enjoyable and freeing to do after concentrating so hard earlier.

This was a gentle re-introduction to class, as we normally produce many more sketches – I’m sure we won’t be treated so leniantly in two weeks time!