Project: Form – Exercise: Essential Elements

16/08/14 & 28/08/14

Essential Elements

This time you will draw a sequence of six different poses lasting ten minutes each.  Adjust the light so that it hits just one side of the model, to emphasise the three-dimensional form.  Take time to look at the model and identify the darkest and lightest areas. Remember the basic shapes and begin to shade in the darkest areas.

Project: Form Exercise: Essential Shapes Ten minute poses Black conte stick on A2 paper

Project: Form
Exercise: Essential Elements
Ten minute poses
Black conte stick on A2 paper

Project: Form Exercise: Essential Shapes Ten minute poses Black conte stick on A2 paper

Project: Form
Exercise: Essential Elements
Ten minute poses
Black conte stick on A2 paper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The first three of the six poses done on this day in the evening using black conte stick and charcoal were as per the brief.  As it was a summer’s evening it was still light and the chair was positioned to the left of a south-facing window.  In drawing 1, the light was fairly even from the front with some light hitting the top of the chair and the model’s shoulders.  In drawing 2, I asked the model to lounge across the arm of the chair towards the right so that more light fell on the front of his upper body.  The back cushion of the chair was dark in contrast to his chest so this made the figure come forward of the chair and gave a three-dimensional effect and the shadow came round the front of the torso.  It would have been more successful had the shadow on the chair seat cushion been darker too – it worked on the right hand side but was omitted from the left.  In drawing 3, I think the model and chair are a more cohesive element.  The model is seated well into the chair and the tones are more realistic, as the evening wore on, there was less light hitting the arm of the chair and the model’s head which brought them together.  It would have been nice to have had time to include more of the surroundings to make a more finalised image.  I had intended to have all three drawings on one sheet to show a series of drawings, but the second drawing demanded more width of paper by its nature if they were to be of similar scale.

Project: Form Exercise: Essential Shapes Ten minute poses Charcoal on A2 paper

Project: Form
Exercise: Essential Elements
Ten minute poses
Charcoal on A2 paper

Project: Form Exercise: Essential Shapes Ten minute poses Charcoal on A2 paper

Project: Form
Exercise: Essential Elements
Ten minute poses
Charcoal on A2 paper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Project: Form Exercise: Essential Shapes Ten minute poses Charcoal on A2 paper

Project: Form
Exercise: Essential Elements
Ten minute poses
Charcoal on A2 paper

The final three 10 minute poses were done nearly two weeks later.  I felt obliged to leave my model alone for a while as the modelling commitment was beginning to be a chore for him.  During the meantime I had been working on other projects that did not demand a model other than myself, however, I was getting impatient to draw a line under this exercise and we were to be away for 10 days at the end of that week. So, after some cajoling and promises of copious cups of tea, we began the next three poses.  I have to admit, I had forgotten the key element of the exercise which is obvious from the drawings.  The light and shade aspects were minimal as I concentrated on the shapes, proportions and form of the figure, which although obviously important, were not the main objective here.  Although, I am fairly happy with the structure particularly of the first in this series because of the downward viewpoint, foreshortening and slight quirky pose, I am disappointed with myself by not working on the tonal aspect more comprehensively.

 

Project: Form – Check and Log

15/09/14

(NB Due to working around availability of models, the Projects, Exercises, Check & Logs and Research Points do not follow the order of the course material)

  • Were you able to maintain a focus on proportion at the same time as creating a sense of weight and three-dimensional form?

Yes, I think this was successful in the main, I struggled to maintain proportion mostly when I omitted to make quick warm up sketches. This is clearly illustrated in the Essential Shapes exercise, where my first drawing is very tight and “scrunched” up, then the final of the five drawings is much more proportionally correct.

Project: Form Exercise: Essential Shapes

Project: Form
Exercise: Essential Shapes
15 minutes each
Charcoal, Conte Stick and some Sharpie Marker

Project: Form Exercise: Essential Shapes

Project: Form
Exercise: Essential Shapes
20 minutes
Charcoal and Conte Stick

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Which drawing gives the best sense of the pose and why?

I am a little torn on which to choose for this, it is between two of the Essential Elements drawings:

Project: Form Exercise: Essential Elements

Project: Form
Exercise: Essential Elements
Charcoal – 10 min pose

Project: Form Exercise: Essential Elements

Project: Form
Exercise: Essential Elements
Charcoal – 10 min pose

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The first drawing on the left captures the pose best, I think, in that it’s just as he was sat, however, the drawing is lacking in weight and I’m not convinced that he is really connected with the chair.  The second drawing, right, brings the chair and model together more, he is definitely sitting in that chair and supported in the corner by the chair back and arm. I think I’ve convinced myself on the second drawing now and was probably drawn to the unusual seating position in the first pose.

  • Was there any movement or gesture away from the model’s central axis. If so did you manage to identify this and put it into your drawing?

Out of the eleven drawings made in this project, half of them deviated from the model’s central axis to lesser or greater degree.  When posing the model, it wasn’t a particularly conscious decision as such, but a result of trying to identify a more interesting shape to draw. I did try to incorporate some twists of the body and legs and taking different view points, and these added to the less than upright poses.  The most extreme of my drawings that showed movement away from the model’s central axis is shown below. The leaning on the sofa from a seated position on the floor together with my viewpoint of standing over the model, gives an exaggerated example.

Project: Form Exercise: Essential Shapes

Project: Form
Exercise: Essential Shapes
10 minutes
Charcoal, Conte Stick

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Project: Form – Exercise: Essential Shapes

10/08/14

Exercise: Essential Shapes

Arrange your model at a slight angle in a chair.  Consider the angle of the central axis that runs through the seated figure. Notice any twists or bends.  Draw the model from different angles and positions.

As I wanted the model to be as comfortable as possible for around an hour’s pose, I changed the chair for cushions on the floor so that he could lean over the sofa and use his lap top to pass the time.  This also allowed a twist in the spine plus I could stand above or be on a level with the model for more interesting drawings.  As I was changing position and viewpoints it wasn’t imperative that he stay and/or return to the exact pose which made it even easier.

Project: Form Exercise: Essential Shapes

Project: Form
Exercise: Essential Shapes
15 minutes each
Charcoal, Conte Stick and some Sharpie Marker

Project: Form Exercise: Essential Shapes

Project: Form
Exercise: Essential Shapes
10 minutes
Charcoal, Conte Stick

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Full notes are written with the drawings. A major lesson learnt was to make 2-3 minute warm up sketches just to loosen up.  This is something regularly done in life classes, although, I think I am very conscious of the time my model has to spend sitting, so often forget to do this. The first drawing clearly demonstrates the need and reasoning behind the discipline, it is very tight and constricted in its appearance, the next is much looser and accurate, and this continues with each of the subsequent ones.

Project: Form Exercise: Essential Shapes

Project: Form
Exercise: Essential Shapes
10 minutes
Charcoal

Project: Form Exercise: Essential Shapes

Project: Form
Exercise: Essential Shapes
20 minutes
Charcoal and Conte Stick

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Conscious as ever of monopolising my model’s time, I begged three further 10 minutes drawings so that I could have a full twenty on the final one.  The shorter poses were great for understanding form and experimenting with how to achieve the essential shapes as was the brief.  I am pleased with the twenty-minute drawing as the figure is anchored in its surroundings – there is a little regret that I didn’t include the lap top he was working on so that the hand position makes more sense, but on the whole it seems to work.