Supplementary Material – Part 4 Drawing Figures

25/10/14

Life Class

Life Class 25/10/14 4B Pencil on Grey Paper Quick Poses 5 -10 mins

Life Class 25/10/14
4B Pencil on Grey Paper
Quick Poses 5 -10 mins

Life Class 25/10/14 6B Pencil on Grey Paper Quick Poses 15 mins

Life Class 25/10/14
6B Pencil on Grey Paper
Quick Poses 15 mins

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today’s theme was using a piece of stretchy fabric that was draped or pulled taut over the figure.  We were to concentrate on the folds, be they loose and fluid or stretched tight over the body.

Life Class 25/10/14 Sanguine, dark brown and white conte stick on brown wrapping paper (matt side)  25 mins pose

Life Class 25/10/14
Sanguine, dark brown and white conte stick on brown wrapping paper (matt side)
25 mins pose

Life Class 25/10/14 Sanguine, dark brown. black and white conte stick on brown wrapping paper (matt side)  40 mins pose

Life Class 25/10/14
Sanguine, dark brown. black and white conte stick on brown wrapping paper (matt side)
40 mins pose

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the longer poses, we were encouraged to change media and draw the figure, the first pose used the fabric, the second didn’t.

 

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Assignment Four: Reflection

Assessment Criteria

Demonstration of Technical and Visual Skills materials, techniques, observational skills, visual awareness, design and compositional skills:

I work very hard at the technical aspects of drawing and composition, with these things becoming more like second nature the more I do.  I feel more confident in self critiquing my work as I am learning more of what is expected of me.  This section of the course, Drawing Figures, has pushed me to hone my observational skills, particularly by sketching people out and about, trying to tell their “story” in a few lines and marks.  I have tried to use more and different drawing tools, in particular the bamboo pen and ink.  This was the first time I’d tried it and I enjoyed the different feel and variety of marks possible.  Design is a part of composition that has come to the fore as I can now envisage an image more clearly in the lines that I see ie diagonals, verticals and horizontals, and how they lead the eye around a scene to create a drawing or painting.

Quality of Outcome content, application of knowledge, presentation of work in a coherent manner, discernment, conceptualisation of thoughts, communication of ideas

I believe now, that I am more confident of translating what I have in my mind onto paper or whatever, the effort put into planning and trying out ideas has paid dividends.  I am learning not only is what is included, but also what is excluded can be fundamental to the final result.  Having recently converted to using an online blog, I enjoy collating my work and thoughts into a format that is clear and readable visually.

Demonstration of Creativity imagination, experimentation, invention, development of a personal voice

This is still my biggest area for development.  I think I will always say this because it is the crux of progression.  However, I need to bring my imagination into play more freely.  My sketchbooks are my lifeblood as I go through this course.  I am beginning to use them more experimentally, noting things as they occur to me, planning, playing and analysing, noting things for later, referring backwards and forwards.  I still have the tendency to be free within the sketchbook but tighten up when producing a final piece of work.  I need to learn to carry this through to the end and not lose courage.

Context reflection, research, critical thinking (learning log)

My learning log together with my sketchbooks contain a lot of self analytical notes.  Recently, I have noticed that I tend to “argue” with myself over points in pieces of work – “is that right?”, “I’m undecided about…” etc.  I’ve realised that if I have to question something I’ve done, then it’s not right for me and it needs more work, if I can be happy with what I’ve done, it’s probably the best I can do at the time, if not, it’s a case of “that’ll do” and that’s not good enough.

I have tried to review previous points for development and test my progress against them, this was particularly useful in this last assignment.

I have enjoyed reading other students’ blogs, looking at other artists and see how they use found objects in their work.  I am looking forward to revisiting some of the sections in the course in Part 5.  I hope to push and surprise myself and experiment more.

Assignment Four: Part Two: Tone

Preparatory Work 07/10/14

Assignment 4 Tone Composition and Pose

Assignment 4
Tone
Composition and Pose

Assignment 4 Tone Composition and Pose

Assignment 4
Tone
Composition and Pose

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assignment 4 Tone Composition and Pose

Assignment 4
Tone
Composition and Pose

Assignment 4 Tone Media and Drawing Tools

Assignment 4
Tone
Media and Drawing Tools

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As before, I have had to take photographs for this drawing.

We were asked to produce a reclining pose, paying particular attention to tone and to focus on the pictorial qualities, making the background as important as the figure.

I decided to wait for the evening so artificial light could be used to throw shadows and produce more tonal contrast.  I used only the lighting available in the room ie an adjustable standard lamp and the secondary light source from the TV screen in the opposite corner.  I took photos from many different view points and angles to try to help build the structure and three-dimensional aspect in my mind.  The background was definite but not overwhelming, I omitted a large pot plant behind the figure as I decided there was enough to make an interesting image without it and I didn’t want it to look overcrowded.

I made a few sketches to establish the composition.  I particularly like a sketch taken from behind the model looking down on his head and along the length of the sofa he was lying on.  However, the light source did bleach out a lot of the tonal contrast.  I decided on the first sketch for the composition due to more tone being evident.

I was  determined not to use the photographs at all in the final piece of work.  This was to test myself in the following ways:

  1. Did the sketch have enough information eg tone, structure and background?  (This was a failing in a previous section “Drawing Outdoors”).
  2. Could I use my memory of previous numerous drawings of the same model together with these sketches to achieve a likeness? (As in the exercise “Portrait from Memory”).
  3. Could I translate the tonal sketch into a colour study? (Something that I have previously struggled with).
  4. As this was to be a drawing incorporating the background to explore pictorial possibilities, could I achieve realistic and accurate perspective in the drawing? (Again a struggle in the previous section “Drawing Outdoors”).

09/10/14

Assignment 4 Tone Final Drawing 50x65cm Pastel and Coloured Pencil

Assignment 4
Tone
Final Drawing 50x65cm
Pastel and Coloured Pencil

Results:

  1. As I had simplified the tonal ranges in the sketch from which I was working,  it was much clearer where light and dark occurred.  I also, in the final drawing, sketched out the entire image in black conte stick and then hatched in the same dark tones in a dark blue pastel before blocking in with colour.  this again described the darks clearly before working in to them. (Note to self: Must take more work in progress photos as this was a particularly interesting and new way of working for me).
  2. The sketches were a good starting point for achieving a likeness.  As the drawing neared completion, I was drawn to the face and was not happy with it.  A few adjustments with coloured pencils and a basic likeness appeared with which I was satisfied.
  3. As the sketch had clear definition and the tonal under-painting was in place, I did not consciously consider the problems I had had translating tone to colour previously.  The precautions I had taken initially made it a natural process.  I couldn’t have been more pleased at this result at this stage in my progress.
  4. The perspective element is something I need to keep working on so I tried not shy away from it in the final drawing.  The aerial perspective seems to have been successful with background objects being described subtly, however, I am still unsure about the sofa.  I can not blame the source photograph as the sketch was in proportion.  I think that as I was working on a larger sheet of paper with slightly different ratio of width to length, that I overcompensated and made the sofa appear too long.  I’m not sure – I need a neutral point of view to case an eye over it I think.

Overall

I think that the sketch works slightly better proportionally than the final drawing.  However, tonally I am very happy with the outcome.  I enjoyed exploring another process by marking in the tones first in one colour as an under-painting, especially as it seems to have worked.  Another note to self: if unsure whether something has worked – it probably hasn’t!

 

Assignment Four: Part one: Line and Shape

Preparatory Work 30/09/14 & 01/10/14

Assignment 4 Line and Shape Prep Selecting a Pose

Assignment 4
Line and Shape Prep
Selecting a Pose

Assignment 4 Line and Shape Prep Facial Features

Assignment 4
Line and Shape Prep
Facial Features

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assignment 4 Line and Shape Prep Hands

Assignment 4
Line and Shape Prep
Hands

Assignment 4 Line and Shape Prep Hands

Assignment 4
Line and Shape Prep
Hands

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assignment 4 Line and Shape Prep Composition and Placement

Assignment 4
Line and Shape Prep
Composition and Placement

Assignment 4 Line and Shape Prep Media and Support

Assignment 4
Line and Shape Prep
Media and Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assignment 4 Line and Shape Prep Media and Support

Assignment 4
Line and Shape Prep
Media and Support

 

Assignment 4 Line and Shape Prep Media and Support

Assignment 4
Line and Shape Prep
Media and Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This assignment has come at a time when my primary model, my husband, has had a change of work place and is not so readily available to pose.  As a result I have much less time to draw from life, and have had to change process significantly to achieve the assignment.  Much as I avoid using photographs as source material ordinarily, needs must.  However, I am determined to make the best of this and have made preliminary sketches to establish composition and pose.  I took many photos from all angles, zoomed in on head, face and hands and have tried using all of these to build my drawing.

I am aware that the camera has only one lens, whereas we have two, this can lead to flattening and distortion of an image.  Things closer to the camera are unnaturally enlarged.  Trying hard to avoid this I made myself work from my sketches rather than slavishly copying the photographs.  Once I’d decided on a viewpoint, I considered the orientation of the support, the media and drawing tools, plus the size of the paper to be used.  I settled on using a sharpened piece of bamboo with sepia acrylic ink.  I wasn’t, however, confident enough to draw straight into the work with these.  I drew and adjusted the drawing in pencil initially to try to ensure accuracy.  Had I been working directly from the model, I may have omitted this stage.

Once sketched out, I then used the bamboo pen lightly to reiterate the outlines.  Once that was complete I worked at varying the line strengths and then worked into the figure with pen and ink only to establish form by using the folds and creases of the clothing.  I felt, although this was a line drawing that I had to indicate the hair and beard more darkly, not for tone, but for likeness purposes.  these are such identifiable aspects of the model, that it wouldn’t have worked so well without this.  Initially, the figure, its chair and table plus the lap top, were the only things in the composition.  I did feel, however, that this left a lot of empty space not only on the paper but in the narrative of the drawing.  Again using pen & acrylic only, I decided to indicate the room as background.  The vertical and horizontal lines added more interest and context to the whole image and as these were drawn with fainter line, they were useful to show depth with their perspective.

06/10/14

Assignment 4 Line and Shape  Final Drawing

Assignment 4
Line and Shape
Final Drawing 57x77cm

 

What didn’t work?

  • I am still undecided as to whether the nearest hand is too large – has the camera influenced me negatively?
  • The additional chairs, I think, need to be there, but has the perspective worked? The most questionable for me are the legs to the chair opposite the figure.
  • I’ve used line to indicate form and shadow on the face and I think the line on the nose is too strong.

What did work?

  • The composition I like – it’s a little unusual although I hope it’s described the form of the figure successfully.
  • The additional background gives a fuller image and composition.
  • The bamboo “pen” worked quite well in varying line strengths and marks.  Once I was using it I felt more confident with it than the dipping pen, which I decided not to use in the end.

I decided not to erase the initial pencil marks as it show the process and I didn’t feel the need to “tidy up”.

 

Drawing Figures – Project: The Moving Figure

30/09/14

Research Point

Go and do some people watching.  This could be at the supermarket, on a bus or train, in the pub or cafe, in a cinema or concert queue.  Whenever you find yourself amongst lots of people have a really good look at them.  Look at how they stand, what they are carrying, what they are doing with their hands, what their chins are like, the difference between a man’s head and a woman’s.  If possible do some quick sketches; or remember and draw up what you observed when you get back.  Record your observations in your learning log.

I started this task over a cup of tea whilst watching BBC Breakfast News.  They were interviewing Michael Palin and I noticed, how striking his position was.  It was probably more so as he was wearing black trousers and sitting on a red sofa, but the camera angle made it interesting.  He was sitting very upright but relaxed and in a typical male pose.  As the camera viewpoint moves every few seconds, I had to remember the position and sketch from that, occasionally, the same view was flashed up but not for long.  I then looked at how the female presenter was sitting, elegantly cross-legged in a very feminine way.  This was also more difficult to catch as although, similar camera angles came up on-screen, due to the more complicated position, a slight difference in viewpoint made a huge difference in the drawn pose.  I tried to memorise it but the drawing is not overly representative.

Project: The Moving Figure Research Point 6B pencil in A4 sketchbook

Project: The Moving Figure
Research Point
6B pencil in A4 sketchbook

After this, as I needed to do some shopping, I packed up my sketchbook and pencils and headed off to Fordingbridge.  I decided to sit in the car park for half an hour and sketch people coming and going.  It was around 9.45am, so a fairly busy time for shoppers.  Most of the people I saw were retired, young mums, small children and some delivery guys.  I began by trying to draw “action” and movement, a man on his mobile phone walking along with his other hand in his pocket, a gran strapping in her young ward in the back seat of the car, a woman searching for change at the parking meter.  It was difficult to understand what was really required of me and not just to repeat previous exercises.  Then I noticed an elderly lady passenger in a car that drove past me and thought I’d try to sketch her from memory.  I was quite pleased with the result and started to notice characteristics common in her age group.

Project: The Moving Figure Research Point 6B pencil in A4 sketchbook

Project: The Moving Figure
Research Point
6B pencil in A4 sketchbook

I decided to concentrate on this aspect of the figures around me, what describes an older person from a younger one?  Some observations from this people watching session are detailed below:

  • head and neck appears pushed further forward
  • chins merge with neck as a result
  • the neck merges into shoulders with less definition
  • stance can look strangely unbalanced when standing with weight evenly distributed over both feet
  • older people tend to hold their shoulders much higher as they walk, even those that appear sprightly
  • also noticed how the elderly can appear more androgynous – similar can be said about young babies – I’m sure there are obvious biological reasons for this as well as social/environmental ones.  Examples of social/environmental reasons could be: women tend to have shorter hair and wear less makeup as they reach old age, many people put on extra weight around the middle or appear thinner – both may merge the male and female silhouette to some extent.

Another woman I managed to sketch was younger, maybe in her thirties or early forties and her overall demeanour was very different.  She was lighter on her feet, her head held a little higher, with a defined neck distinguishable from her chin and shoulders.

I suppose I had noticed this before but when studied to this degree, it becomes quite startling as an indicator of a figure’s age.  It is also a lesson to me that good posture is very important and is probably a much more successful method of reducing those signs of aging than miracle creams!

Drawing Figures – Project: Self Portrait

29/09/14

Research Point

Investigate some artists’ self portraits.  Look at both well-known self portraits – such as Rembrandt and van Gogh, and at lesser known artists.  Make notes in your learning log.

I decided to avoid the most obvious self portraits (although many are favourites eg Rembrandt, van Gogh, Degas etc),  if there is such a thing, and looked for well-known artists that come to mind a little further down the list so to speak.

Frida Kahlo (1907-1954) – Mexico City

A fascinating life and many self portraits.  Frida Kahlo loaded her paintings with symbolism and story

Research Point Self Portraits Frida Kahlo - Self Portrait

Research Point
Self Portraits
Frida Kahlo – Self Portrait

telling.  I think she very much captured the essence of herself, not only in her features but in adding the relevant narrative for that specific time in her life’s story.  I watched a documentary about her some months ago, this followed her life, loves and tragedies which can be read throughout her self portraits.  Recovering from a horrendous traffic accident as a teenager, she had many months of recuperation and was never fully free of pain afterwards.  Therefore, she had nothing but her painting and, confined to bed, probably no other subject than herself.

She also depicted, sometimes quite graphically, her inability to carry her three pregnancies to full term due to her injuries. Not shy of describing her conditions and personal tragedies as a woman, she was revered by feminists for her illustrative candour.  Her life ended at the age of 47 in 1954 but had spanned many turbulent and transitional world events politically, artistically and religiously.  Religion and her Mexican culture played a large part in her life and therefore, her paintings.  If anyone truly painted themselves, it was Frida Kahlo.

Research Point Self Portraits Frida Kahlo - The Broken Column

Research Point
Self Portraits
Frida Kahlo – The Broken Column

I chose Kahlo because of the extra narrative she brought to her self portraits, the symbolism is rife within them and I can not begin to imagine how to use that in my own work.  I hope that over time, I can find such a personal voice to demonstrate feelings, emotions and beliefs in such a way that they inject more life and meaning into my images.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Egon Schiele (1890 – 1918)

Another prolific painter of the self-portrait, Egon Shiele was way ahead of his time in my humble opinion.  A few adjectives and phrases come to mind: stunning, expressive, disturbing, flexible, explicit, innovative, graphic, contortionist, self-aware, uninhibited…

Research Point Self Portraits Egon Schiele - Self Portrait

Research Point
Self Portraits
Egon Schiele – Self Portrait

Research Point Self Portraits Egon Schiele - Self Portrait

Research Point
Self Portraits
Egon Schiele – Self Portrait

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Schiele was mentored by Gustav Klimt and his influence is sometimes clear, yet he has a very distinctive style of his own.  Exaggerating his own skinny physique with strong, jagged line and knobbly joints, Schiele manages to produce wonderfully twisted and expressive poses.  How on earth he managed to do this I don’t know – multiple mirrors, memory, a multitude of sketches?  However he did it, his work is unmistakable.  The facial expressions are numerous and vivid – I can’t imagine how he managed keep his expression and reproduce it at the same time.

His untimely death at the age of 28 leaves one wondering what he would have gone on to do had he lived longer.

Onto my supposedly lesser known artists and their self portraits.  I had whittled my list down to four:  Bryan Lewis Saunders, Paula Modensohn-Becker, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner and Kathe Kollwitz.  For the purpose of this research point I’ve decided to go from the sublime to the ridiculous with no insult or pre-judgement intended, so it’s Kathe Kollwitz and Bryan Lewis Saunders.

Kathe Kollwitz (1867-1945)
(Käthe Kollwitz. [Internet]. 2014. The Biography.com website. Available from: http://www.biography.com/people/käthe-kollwitz-37900 [Accessed 29 Sep 2014].
Supporting information from Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K%C3%A4the_Kollwitz

A quick introduction:
Kathe Kollwitz was a German draughtsman, painter and sculptor born in Kalinigrad, Russia formally known as Konigsberg, East Prussia 1867.  She studied at art schools for women in Berlin and Munich.  she excelled drawing working people and studies of the human condition.  I have to admit, I didn’t know of this artist until discussing self portraits at my life drawing class and her name came up.  I have researched some of her drawings and her self portraits are simply brilliant.  Again, a very expressive style with an abundance of emotion and feeling encased in her mark making.

Self Portraits Research Point Kathe Kollwitz - Self Portrait 1898

Self Portraits
Research Point
Kathe Kollwitz – Self Portrait 1898

Self Portraits Research Point Kathe Kollwitz - Self Portrait 1910

Self Portraits
Research Point
Kathe Kollwitz – Self Portrait 1910

Self Portraits Research Point Kathe Kollwitz - Self Portrait 1938

Self Portraits
Research Point
Kathe Kollwitz – Self Portrait 1938

Self Portraits Research Point Kathe Kollwitz - Self Portrait 1924

Self Portraits
Research Point
Kathe Kollwitz – Self Portrait 1924

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A selection of self portraits spanning 40 years.  The likeness is always there, with the added life experience clearly depicted.  I especially like the 1924 charcoal drawing on tinted paper, such an economic style but speaks volumes.

Bryan Lewis Saunders
http://bryanlewissaunders.org/drugs/

A quirky choice which I described as ridiculous earlier.  This is not to be derogatory regarding his skill and style but maybe could have referred to his methods of one particular self-portrait series.  Saunders another prolific self portraitist, has, since 1995, made it a mission to complete at least one self-portrait per day until his end – over 8000 so far.  He has many hardback sketchbooks dedicated to this task and his drawings take many guises not least the “Under the Influence” series.  In this series, Saunders took a different drug, prescriptive or otherwise each day, and drew himself under the influence.  Not a method I’d recommend, even in my non-medical capacity, I can see this just maybe detrimental to one’s health.  In fact the artist himself admits it wasn’t ideal considering he did damage his brain to a recoverable degree, although he says he’s still continuing the experiment but not so intensively – each to their own.  I have attached a link to his website, as I’m not sure copyright would allow me to reproduce the images on my blog.  I have to say, some of them are very eye-catching and expressive, but then I probably would have expected that.  Here are the titles of those that particularly caught my eye (this is not a shopping list):

1 sm glass of “real” absinth
Bathsalts (?????)
1 “bump” of Crystal meth (can’t believe I’m typing this!)
PCP
20mg Valium
2mg Xanax

I did wonder, though, how much the intoxication actually influenced the drawing and how much was a, however subconscious, pre-conceived image.  Some are very obviously, out there and floating!  However the inspiration was attained, there is a clear likeness running through the images, even the more abstract and/or expressive ones.  From the recipe list above, my favourites are Bathsalts and PCP.

To be fair, some of his portraits were as a result of medication given in the ER for kidney stones.  Maybe I should do a sketch directly after my multi-vitamin in the morning!?

Supplementary Material – Part 4 Drawing Figures

27/09/14

Life Drawing Class

Today’s life class introduced a new model to most of us.  Annie is a very tall, statuesque figure with grace and poise with fantastic curves and lines – a pleasure to draw.

We started with the usual fairly quick poses of 5-7 minutes, perched on a chair back, standing leaning on

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14 5-7 minute poses Pencil on A2 paper

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14
5-7 minute poses
Pencil on A2 paper

the chair and sitting on the chair.  As is usual the first drawing is tight and static, but the standing drawing shows the lean and slight twist in the body with the weight firmly on the right foot.  The seated pose was a little off proportionately but the weight of the figure is on the chair.

 

 

The next two poses were seated on a chair and on the floor.  Standing at the side of the room I had a lot of foreshortening to contend with – I enjoy this challenge and it usually makes for a more interesting image.

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14 10-12 minute poses Pencil on A2 paper

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14
10-12 minute poses
Pencil on A2 paper

The pose seated on a chair, with the model turned towards me showed fabulous long, curvy lines on the model’s right side which were very tactile to draw. I tried to vary the line strengths and use tone to help denote the foreshortening.  However, today, hands are getting the better of me, I don’t think I managed to achieve success in a single drawing!

The next, seated on the floor was again a beautiful pose.  Annie held her hand up in a most elegant way and I totally made it into a bunch of bananas.  In my defence, I was concentrating on the back against the cushions, where the flesh was pressed and folded around the supporting structure.  Again, tried to use a variety of line strengths.

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14 10-12 minute poses Pencil on A2 paper

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14
10-12 minute poses
Coloured pencil on A2 paper

The final long pose was around 40 minutes, I decided to move round to the other side of the model as I could only see one hand (and I obviously need the practice), plus the foreshortened, bent leg was more interesting to draw.  Although I started out plotting the shapes in the space, as I drew I noticed that I needed to make the upper chest area longer, which resulted in slicing off the top of the head unfortunately.  I had also decided to use coloured pencil which I hadn’t tried before in life drawing.  This was probably the largest I would have wanted to draw in this media and although it was nice to be able to vary the line strength as with graphite pencil, I did find it limiting with regards to depth of tone.

As usual, with our classes, there was a specific objective or consideration as a theme.  Today, we looked at cropping to make an image more readable, selective and/or attractive for want of a better word.  We had a selection of pre-cut mounts to put over our drawings to experiment with the final composition.  Although, we try to consider the placement of our subjects prior to beginning our drawings, there are inevitably instances where, another image can be discovered by selecting specific areas on which to concentrate, or, as demonstrated above, if you manage to get the placement wrong, you may be able to rescue this with careful cropping.

Below are some attempts to “crop” my drawings of today:

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14 Placing a virtural mount to "crop" the image

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14
Placing a virtual mount to “crop” the image

 

Here, I chose to crop in this way as the model appears to be looking off into the distance, so this gives her the space to do that.

 

 

 

 

 

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14 Placing a virtural mount to "crop" the image

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14
Placing a virtual mount to “crop” the image

 

This produced a nice diagonal design which leaves space for the image to “breathe” and allows the eye to follow around the space.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14 Placing a virtural mount to "crop" the image

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14
Placing a virtual mount to “crop” the image

 

Well, yes, the ulterior motive is to cut out the awful depiction of the model’s hand, however, it also gives a pleasing diagonal design to the image and concentrates the eye on the flowing lines of the figure.

 

 

 

 

 

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14 Placing a virtural mount to "crop" the image

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14
Placing a virtual mount to “crop” the image

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14 Placing a virtural mount to "crop" the image

Life Drawing Class 27/09/14
Placing a virtual mount to “crop” the image

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two images from one.  The first is again, an attempt to rescue the unsuccessful subject placement, it also helps give the model a support for her leaning pose.  The edge of the crop almost appears to be the object she is leaning against.  In the second example, an area is selected on which the viewer can concentrate and transforms the image from a landscape orientation to portrait.

This, again, was a valuable and timely exercise.  It is something I will take into consideration for the preparation of my forthcoming assignment of two figure drawings.  Of course, the concentration will be on form, structure, line and tone as appropriate but the placement of the figure in the space is also an important factor.  I will look back at my still life drawings in my sketchbook as those arrangements on the page contributed to making the entire image more interesting.