Project 3: Variations using Masks and Multi-Colours

20, 22, 25/04/16

Variations using Masks and Multi-Colours

Now you have started to explore masks and printing from a printing plate you can begin to experiment. Try out some new ideas using masks, layers of colours, painted printing plates and so on.

Here I followed instructions on how to create a three colour masked monoprint. It uses two colours with a negative mask for positive prints and one positive mask to give a negative print as a background colour.

Three coloured monoprint - with additional overprinted without the masks

Three coloured monoprint – with additional overprinted without the masks

 

 

I was disappointed with the initial result as the yellow was too far over, although I purposely was not trying to print each colour on top of the other. I then tried overprinting with both negative and positive masks removed. This wasn’t really what I was after but it’s good to play and experiment and I can’t expect it always to be effective.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three coloured monoprint using 2 negative masks and 1 positive on A2 white medium weight cartridge paper

Three coloured monoprint using 2 negative masks and 1 positive on A2 white medium weight cartridge paper

 

 

After the first attempt I decided to just follow the instructions and see what happened. I also decided to use the medium weight cartridge paper again as it is more of a brilliant white and thought it would look good against the mix of colours. This worked well and although the yellow is a little over, it still looks pleasing to me.

 

 

 

 

 

Varied Masks of Natural and Found Objects, Textures and Solvents

The idea here was to experiment with textures and colours to achieve unusual and creative effects in the monoprints. This was a huge learning curve of how to use found objects as masks, consistency of inks, colours, papers and printing pressure.

Man-made objects and solvent on A3 newsprint

Man-made objects and solvent on A3 newsprint

 

My first attempt is an A4 print on A3 newsprint. Using red and yellow oil inks overlapping to mix colours on the print itself. Coiled string, bubble wrap and gauze were used as masks, ink was lifted out with a brush handle and solvent was dripped and splashed onto the print plate to achieve different effects. Several layers of printing were used to produce this and this is evidenced by pure colour on white, and the colour beneath coming through in places.

 

 

 

 

Ghost print on A3 newsprint

Ghost print on A3 newsprint

 

 

As there was still a substantial amount of ink on the plate after the above print, I decided to take a ghost print on a fresh sheet of newsprint. This was still quite distinct and the drops of solvent show up even better almost like bubbles with less ink with which to print. The bubble wrap is also much more obvious as I would guess the top layer of yellow ink was spent in the first completed print and the bottom red layer has remained. This was a fascinating experiment and was worth noting the results for how to achieve effects in the future.

 

 

 

A4 print on A3 white cartridge paper.

A4 print on A3 white cartridge paper.

 

Using two colours of yellow and blue with layering producing green as the third. Again using man-made masks of gauze and bubble wrap, with natural masks of dried sliced orange. Drops of solvent, although not so much as before, disperse the inks letting the pure colours come through. Again, the ink was scratched into with a brush handle giving nice clear squiggle patterns. I was a little disappointed that the orange slices didn’t really show as much definition as I’d hoped.

 

 

 

 

A4 print on A3 white cartridge paper

A4 print on A3 white cartridge paper

 

This time, still using two colours I decided to use blocks of pure colour and join them with the masks and patterns in the design. I used a small piece of fabric mesh, bubble wrap (the same piece as used before which had ink on it so printed itself), some solvent drops and a squiggly pattern made by a brush handle again. I have reused many of the same methods and masks, however, it is fascinating to me how different each print still is.

 

 

 

 

 

A4 print on A3 white cartridge paper

A4 print on A3 white cartridge paper

 

Here a yellow layer was inked first with a some large drops of solvent attempting to make some flower like shapes. A second layer of blue with more drops of solvent, trying to vary the sizes and dragging some of these drops to make stems. Some scratching into blue layer for texture and added organic shapes. This illustrated the unpredictable nature of printing as although I was trying to create a flower like image, it did begin to resemble underwater coral or water based plant life. I think the colours used also contributed to this.

 

 

 

Using What has been Learnt to Create a Landscape

When you can see the possibilities of this process, make a print depicting a landscape or town scape using the print of different items.

This was a fun task and involved some working into the inks with a rag, cotton bud and using layers of colour to create others. Even though this was a landscape, I used both natural and man-made items to create shapes with a little solvent to give blurred “cauliflowers”. I managed to build some tone into the image although it could have had more and it is more expressive than realistic. Having said that, it sort of works.

Landscape built from layered ink and textures. A4 print of landscape on A3 cartridge paper.

Landscape built from layered ink and textures. A4 print of landscape on A3 cartridge paper.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s