Painted Monoprint from Life

15/03/15

Painted Monoprints from Life

…Explore a subject as your would in a painting. A painted image on the printing plate can be transferred to your printing paper and produces an exciting and creative response to your subject.

I chose two objects as instructed with different textures and made some sketches in my sketchbook to find the composition I was happy with.

Compositional planning in A4 sketchbook with notes

Compositional planning in A4 sketchbook with notes

 

I was attracted to the spool of string for its textures and pattern of wound thread which was a contrast to the smooth ceramic of the milk jug.

 

 

 

 

 

From the selected sketch I made several prints, mostly reworking the original plate with a variety of marks, tones and ink consistencies.  Understanding the nature of the inks and how they print is a vast learning curve. Allowing the result to reveal itself without too much of a preconceived idea is a lesson in itself.

Again I have used black, brown, orange and gold inks – still awaiting delivery of my supplies but these have worked pretty well regardless.

 

This was interesting and quite surprising in its results. I was disappointed with the black ink, which was quite different in consistency, direct from the tube, to the other inks although they were all water-soluble and the same brand. Generally, I think that Print 3 was probably the most successful:

Print 3 Jug is much more defined - string less so

Print 3 Jug is much more defined – string less so

… although I actually like the last print the best of them all – shame about the orange blob on the string though:

Print 7 Reworked plate from print 6 , misted with water, textured marks and wiping out

Print 7 Reworked plate from print 6 , misted with water, textured marks and wiping out

Lessons learnt:

  • It may well be beneficial to test the inks before using on the image to understand how each behaves with different levels of concentration to water/solvent – even when using the same brands
  • Take care with random drips and blobs that will spoil the overall effect
  • Don’t let preconceived ideas of the end result take root!
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