Exercise: Squaring Up

29/11/15

Exercise: Squaring Up

The principle is simple – you simply draw squares over the photo or drawing… mark proportionately larger squares on your working surface… Then transfer everything that appears on a small square onto a larger one, paying careful attention to the relationships of the objects to the intersecting lines…

Once the drawing is in place, begin the painting… Your drawing is there as a guide, not a tablet of stone, so let the painting develop with reference to your original idea.

Original photo ( 16 x 12cm) squared up and the enlarged painting after the first session. Acrylic on acrylic paper 32 x 24cm

Original photo ( 16 x 12cm) squared up and the enlarged painting after the first session.
Acrylic on acrylic paper
32 x 24cm

I decided to use a photograph that I took some years ago in Polperro, Cornwall. I initially marked a border round to establish where I wanted the composition focus. I found the numbering of the squares very useful to plan the placement of the main shapes. This technique actually kept me from being too detailed in the drawing. Once the main elements were drawn in, I added paint loosely and tried to stick to shapes and tones initially. Just before I finished the first session, I decided to scrub over the paint with a damp brush, which, as it was acrylic, was mostly dry but what wet paint there was, softened and blurred. I did this to ensure I didn’t become too tight in the painting. I am hoping that by doing this I will keep the painting loose in the next session.

30/11/15

Squared up source photo and notes from sketchbook

Squared up source photo and notes from sketchbook

 

 

Continued with the painting, using the reference photo to assist with shapes and tones.

 

 

 

 

Trying desperately not to get bogged down in detail, I worked in darks to bring out shapes of the boats and general tonal painting of the buildings. Nearing completion I took the painting away from the photo and reassessed the overall effect. Detail had crept in particularly with the buildings’ windows, taking these down in prominence, darkening the front of the buildings themselves and lightening the roofs to indicate the sunlight brought it all together more successfully.  I am still disappointed at the lack of painterly brush-strokes but came to the conclusion that I had spent more than enough time on this. The main objective was the rescaling using the squaring up technique, which itself was successful.

Squaring up - Final painting Acrylic on paper 32 x 24cm

Squaring up – Final painting
Acrylic on paper
32 x 24cm

 

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